Fertility Preservation Research Studies

Testicular Tissue Freezing

The Fertility Preservation Program and Center for Reproduction and Transplantation at Magee-Womens Hospital, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center are now recruiting for a research study in which research will be done on testicular tissue. It may be of interest to male subjects who wish to freeze testicular tissue because of risk of infertility due to their disease or medical treatment. This IRB-approved research protocol is open to males of any age with two testes who have a newly-diagnosed or recurrent disease or medical treatment (such as chemotherapy or radiation) that puts them at significant risk for infertility.

For young patients who are not yet producing mature sperm or males who cannot produce a semen sample, techniques are in development to use frozen testicular tissue to produce sperm and/or restore fertility.

In this study, the testicular tissues are collected during surgery:

  • the majority of tissue (75%) is banked for future reproductive use by the patient.
  • a portion of the tissue (25%) is used in ongoing research to develop technologies to produce sperm from the tissue (either inside the body or outside the body).

The research study will cover the costs of surgery, tissue processing, tissue freezing, and the first year of frozen storage.


Ovarian Tissue Freezing

The Fertility Preservation Program in Pittsburgh and the Center for Reproduction and Transplantation at Magee-Womens Hospital, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center is enrolling patients for ovarian tissue cryopreservation. This IRB-approved experimental protocol is open to:

  • Women under the age of 40;
  • Who have a newly diagnosed or recurrent disease or medical treatment (e.g., chemotherapy or radiation) that puts them at significant risk for infertility

This research study is for female patients facing a gonadotoxic disease or treatment regimen that can threaten fertility. For young patients who are not yet producing mature eggs or women who are unable to freeze eggs, frozen ovarian tissue might be used in the future to restore fertility or hormone function.

The program will cover the costs of surgery, tissue processing, tissue freezing, and the first year of frozen storage.




Interested in participating in one of the fertility research studies above? Contact us for more information.